All Posts By

Christina Lippincott

When Canning Was King: A Documentary by the Preston Historical Society

The Preston Historical Society will host a premier showing of their latest video production, the documentary “When Canning Was King,” at its membership meeting on Monday, October 21, at 7 PM. The story of the canning industry in Preston and the surrounding areas is told by way of interviews with locals Dick Christopher, Gene Harris, James Hubbard, Lorenzo Hubbard, and Virginia Sharp, and with photographs and published accounts.

The industry grew up at the turn of the 20th century, reaching its peak in 1920, when 41 canning houses could be found in and around Preston. While the canning business faded away due to changes in farming and technology, another industry it helped create, truck brokerages, which were instrumental in helping move the canned goods out of Preston and into markets around the country, still thrives in the region today.

The creation of this documentary was funded in part by Stories of the Chesapeake Heritage Area. Gail Karge served as Project Manager and provided narration, Producer and Script Writer for the documentary was Angela Rieck, Linda Fletcher provided a character voice, theme music was provided by Robert Karge Sr., videography, editing and a character voice was provided by Warren Brey of In Focus Video Production.

Preston Historical Society is located at 167 Main Street in Preston, and is open Saturdays from April to December, 10 AM to 2 PM, except for some holiday weekends, and by appointment. More information can be found at its website, PrestonHistoricalSociety.com, or on its Facebook Page, “Preston Historical Society.”

Eco Fest Coming to Preston on September 28th, 2019

Eco Fest debuts on Saturday, September 28, 10am-2pm, at the Preston Town Park, 105 Back Landing Road, Preston. The idea for Eco Fest originated with a couple members of Bethesda United Methodist Church in Preston. Concerned about the trash on the side of the roads and wanting to help improve their community, they decided to launch an effort to raise awareness of what each person can do to help make the world a better (and cleaner) place. Event chair Suzy Staehlin explains, “There are so many easy little things each and every one of us can do to make the world a better place. Our motto is ‘I refuse to do nothing.’ Just because we can’t do everything doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do something. Eco Fest is all about easy and practical steps we can each take to protect and improve the world around us.”

Kids and adults will find plenty to do. The Fish Mobile from Phillips Wharf Environmental Center will be on hand. The Fish Mobile is a bus-size portable aquarium featuring fish and aquatic species native to local waterways. Adkins Arboretum will have activities for children. Other activities for children include face painting, interactive displays, games, and Smokey Bear! Exhibitors will have information for homeowners on how they can help protect water quality and enhance wildlife habitat.   

Free hotdogs, live music, and giveaways make it a day for the whole family to enjoy, rain or shine. Eco Fest is sponsored by Bethesda United Methodist Church, Preston, MD. For more information, go to www.prestonbethesdaumc.org, or email bethesdachurchoffice@gmail.com, or call 410-673-7538.

Governor Larry Hogan Proclaims September as International Underground Railroad Month

Governor Larry Hogan today proclaimed September as International Underground Railroad Month, which recognizes Maryland as the most powerful destination for authentic Underground Railroad history. It also commemorates all those involved in the Underground Railroad, including Maryland’s courageous Harriet Tubman, the brilliant orator Frederick Douglass, and thousands of freedom seekers.

“Maryland has the most documented successful escapes, and was heavily active in the Underground Railroad,” said Governor Hogan. “Recognizing International Underground Railroad month in Maryland honors the heroism of many brave men, women, and children who took a dangerous journey along the Underground Railroad and those who fought for their freedom.”

Visitors can explore the powerful history and stories of courage through interpretive materials, tours, attractions, and guides as they visit Maryland’s Network to Freedom sites. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway provides visitors with the opportunity to walk in Tubman’s footsteps, while the “Following in His Footsteps: Maryland’s Frederick Douglass Driving Tour” traces Douglass’s story around the state.

Maryland, as a true epicenter of the Underground Railroad, was home to many of the Underground Railroad’s leaders. Throughout the state, partners have come together to tell the stories of Tubman and Douglass, as well as Henry Highland Garnet, Josiah Henson, the William Still Family, and J.W.C. Pennington.

“As the nation’s first ethnic commission, we are pleased to join Governor Hogan in recognizing the authentic history of the Underground Railroad whereby countless brave men, women, and children enslaved here in Maryland were able to escape to their freedom,” said Rev. Dr. Tamara England Wilson, chair of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture. “Their stories which reveal cooperation across racial lines will inspire each of us today to do our part in ensuring that all people enjoy the freedoms that this nation affords.”

Today marks the 181st anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s self-liberation from Baltimore’s President Street Station. September 17, 2019 will mark the 170th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s self-liberation from Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

For more information and to plan the journey along the Underground Railroad, visit https://www.visitmaryland.org/UGRR.

Adkins Arboretum’s Beer Garden Returns September 28

Local beer, fresh seafood, ice cream and music by The High & Wides are all on tap when Adkins Arboretum hosts its second annual Beer Garden on Sat., Sept. 28.

Like the large-haul trains for which the band is named, The High & Wides project a big, driving sound—mountain music reimagined for a new century. Regional favorites hailing from Chestertown, the group released its debut album, Lifted, to widespread acclaim in 2018. Dubbed the “apostles of hillbilly boogie” by The Washington Post, the group draws from its members’ extensive bluegrass backgrounds to take the music to a place all their own, recalling an era when old-time, rockabilly and proto-rock ‘n’ roll coexisted in a murky soup of hillbilly string band music.

Centreville’s Bull & Goat Brewery will be pulling premium craft beer and homemade root beer, complemented by fresh seafood from Centreville’s family-owned Bay Shore Steam Pot and small-batch “cow to cup” ice cream served by American Corner’s Nice Farms Creamery.

The Beer Garden runs from 4 to 6 p.m. As the day cools down, guests can dance to the band, take a woodland walk or join in games. Admission is $10 in advance and $15 at the door for adults, $5 for children ages 3 to 18 and free for children ages 2 and under. Beer and food are an additional fee. Seating is limited; please bring chairs or blankets to enjoy the event.

Advance registration is appreciated. To register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

July Pollinator Programs at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum will host a trio of programs this month aimed at educating about pollinators, their needs and ways to increase their vital habitat. All programs will be led by Melinda Fegler and Lindsay Hollister of Pollinators Prospering People (PX3), a nonprofit dedicated to promoting sustainable pollinator habitat. Programs include:

Befriending Bumblebees, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 14. Learn about the bumble’s importance for wildlife and for humans’ edible gardens. Participants will learn Maryland bumble ID and how to design a garden to attract bumblebees, as well as build a bumblebee hive box.

Solitary Bee Beginnings, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 21. What is a solitary bee? Learn about the ecology, life cycles and groupings of these lone workers. Participants will also learn about garden additions for solitary bees, build a solitary bee condo and practice identification.

Caterpillars to Butterflies, 1–4 p.m. on Sun., July 28. Learn about the mysteries of and threats to these beautiful pollinators and the important role they play in the natural world. Participants will build a chrysalis tree, learn to use identification resources and practice skills during a NABA butterfly count.

Each program is $35 for Arboretum members and $40 for non-members. All three sessions count as continuing education for Master Gardeners and for Maryland Master Naturalists. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

New Murals in Downtown Denton

On Saturday, May 11 a new mural, which also acts as official town signage, was unveiled at the Community Garden in downtown Denton, MD. This project, funded by Downtown Denton Main Street and the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, features artwork by local artist Nicholas Tindall.

Goals for this project include welcoming visitors to Denton, as well as bringing members of the community together to participate in activities and entertainment in the Community Park, which features a performance stage and new vegetable gardens.

The new mural sign consists of six different large scale painted panels, each featuring unique floral artwork and native species of Maryland. “We spent time thinking about the specific content of the mural and decided that it should feature floral specimens native to our State. Of course, we had to include the Black-Eyed Susan, in addition to several other interesting and colorful varieties,” says artist Nicholas Tindall.

Denton hosted their annual event, Spring Thing, featuring local artisans, live music, and an outdoor Plein Air painting competition involving youth participants as well as known professional artists from the area.

Donations were collected to raise money for local causes and awards were given to best paintings from the event. A dedication ceremony for the new mural and official town signage took place that afternoon to conclude the festivities.

You can visit the new Community Garden in Denton on Gay Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets. Various activities and performances will take place throughout the year.

For more information about upcoming community events, visit: DowntownDenton.com and CarolineArts.org.

Nicholas Tindall is a self-taught local artist from Easton, MD. To view more of his projects and upcoming events, visit NicholasTindall.com.

 

Forest Music Returns June 6 to Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum joins the National Music Festival in presenting a unique improvisatory performance in the Arboretum forest on Thurs., June 6 when the NewBassoon Institute performs Forest Music.

Positioning themselves throughout the forest, within hearing distance though not necessarily within sight of one another, these innovative musicians will engage in a musical conversation that winds throughout the trees. Following the forest performance, there will be a brief concert at the Visitor’s Center. The program begins at 4 p.m.

Forest Music is free, though donations are welcome. Light refreshments and a cash wine and beer bar will be available. Advance registration is appreciated atadkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

The NewBassoon Institute is an annual workshop taught by “bassoon supergroup” Dark in the Song. The workshop focuses on contemporary bassoon literature, performance techniques and pedagogy, with the aim of teaching a new generation of open-minded players and bringing the bassoon and bassoon ensembles to the forefront of 21st-century music-making.

The National Music Festival brings together inspiring mentors and the next generation of gifted musicians, providing education, scholarships and affordable, adventurous public performances in and around Chestertown, Md., for two weeks each June. This year’s Festival is June 2–15. Visit nationalmusic.us for more information.

Adkins Arboretum’s Medieval Forest Fair is June 15 

Revel in a day of forest fun when Adkins Arboretum celebrates its second annual Medieval Forest Faire from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sat., June 15. Inspired by legends and lore of the medieval period, Forest Faire offers a wide variety of activities and entertainment for families in search of outdoor fun.

Adventurers of all ages are invited to embark on a forest quest and search among the trees for the Green Man of the ancient Celts. Some of the many activities planned include building with wattle and daub, guided foraging, archery practice, a labyrinth, cooking pottage over a campfire, medieval crafts and constructing “castles” with sections of tree stumps.

Medieval ballads and madrigals will be performed throughout the day by Ampersand and the Allegro Women’s Chorus. Fortunetelling and demonstrations by a local falconer will be ongoing, and the festivities will close with sword dancing by the Sammati Dance Company of Caroline County.

Fairegoers are encouraged to wear Camelot-inspired costumes and to bring their cameras for photos with notable nobles. Unicorn rides by Snapdragon Stables and refreshments, including ice cream by local Nice Farms Creamery, will be available for purchase.

Admission to Forest Faire is $10 per person for adults and children ages 6 and over. Children ages 5 and under are admitted free. Advance registration is appreciated. To register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.